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Subject Guides

Referencing styles - a Practical Guide

AMS/LMS

AMS/LMS referencing style

American Mathematical Society & London Mathematical society

Used by: Mathematics (check which you need)

Introduction to AMS referencing style

In-text citations

AMS uses a numbering system for in-text citations. The most common is to add the number of the reference (as it appears in the reference list) in square brackets after the information:

Cinkir established the conjecture in [2] by using [34].


You can also refer to a specific part of a source in a citation:

When K is a number field, Ullmo proved in 1998 that the conjecture holds (cf. [25, Theorem 1.1]).


You might also see citations based on the author name and publication year, like [Ullmo98] or [U98]

Reference list

The reference list at the end of the document includes the full details of each source so the reader can find them themselves. It is ordered alphabetically by author name and then numbered.

Information needed

[#] Author’s name as it appears. Title of article. Shortened Journal Title. Volume Number (Year of publication), issue number, page range, DOI, mathematical review number.

Examples

[2] Zubeyir Cinkir, Zhang’s conjecture and the effective Bogomolov conjecture over function fields, Invent. Math. 183 (2011), no. 3, 517–562, DOI 10.1007/s00222-010-0282-7. MR2772087
[3] X. W. C. Faber, The geometric Bogomolov conjecture for curves of small genus, Experiment. Math. 18 (2009), no. 3, 347–367. MR2555704

Information needed

[#] Author’s name as it appears. Title of book. Publisher, City of publication, Year of publication. Mathematical review number.

Example

[10] Serge Lang, Fundamentals of Diophantine geometry, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1983. MR715605

All examples from the AMS referencing style guide linked below.

Useful resources

Introduction to LMS referencing style

In-text citations

LMS uses a numbering system for in-text citations, where the number of the reference (as it appears in the reference list) is given in bold type in square brackets after the information:

This has also been found by other methods [4, 8-10, 13].


You can also refer to specific sections, theorems, figures or chapters in a citation. These are not given in bold type:

...as show by Smith [2, 3.2]  


For more details, see section 6.17.5 of the LMS referencing style guide below.

Reference list

The reference list at the end of the document includes the full details of each source so the reader can find them themselves. It is ordered alphabetically by author name and then numbered.

Information needed

#. Initial. Surname, 'Title of article', Shortened Journal Title. Volume Number (Year of publication), issue number, page range, DOI, mathematical review number.

Examples

8. K. Erdmann, K. Lux, Muller and M. Ringe, ‘Peakword condensation and sub-module lattices’, J. Symbolic Comput. 17 (1994) 529–544.
9. G. Zkuyama, ‘A-hypergeometric ranks’, Int. Math. Res. Notices 2006 (2006) 70814, doi:10.1155/IMRN/ 206/70814.

Information needed

#. Initial. Surname. Title of book (Publisher, Place, Date).

Example

3. J. H. Conway, R. T. Curtis, S. P. Norton, R. A. Parker and R. A. Wilson, Atlas of finite groups (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1985).


For examples of edited books, referring to specific chapters and specific editions, see section 6.17.3.b of the LMS referencing style guide below.

All examples from the LMS referencing style guide linked below.

Useful resoources